PERSONAL HOBBIES

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McClura

Active Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2015
Messages
28
Location
Oklahoma
I have been catching up on building Cedar arrows for this fall. I have several different weight bows and styles so I make a dozen for each bow each year. I have been splicing some turkey feathers from my tom last year and some white turkey feathers for some hunting arrows I'm making. I will be putting stone points on the next set.
Mike
 

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flashpoint

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
137
I have been catching up on building Cedar arrows for this fall. I have several different weight bows and styles so I make a dozen for each bow each year. I have been splicing some turkey feathers from my tom last year and some white turkey feathers for some hunting arrows I'm making. I will be putting stone points on the next set.
Mike
 

flashpoint

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Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
137
Mc. Your cedar arrows are really beautifully made. Nice to know that kind of traditional craftsmanship still exists. Must give you lots of satisfaction in that you are using feathers from your own turkey; and stone points no less. Beautiful work. You should try out for a spot on the TV show "Mountain Men" givin' that Tom Oar has moved to Florida. Makes me want to go back to traditional archery. FP
 

Mossie

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Jan 29, 2017
Messages
163
As always I'm left of center. One of my hobbies, a money injection '90 Silverado with a 71 Olds 468 cu inj from a W-31 series 442. Complete computer controlled fuel injected roller motor, alum heads with oversize valves . approx. 450-500 HP, new Dyno just installed in Laramie so I'll know this summer. Always had fast Oldsmobiles when I could afford them when younger so I wanted the pickup Olds never built. Currently in the bodyshop being painted, wishing now I had waited on this phase of my project considering the economic environment. Oh well, that's what I sold my bike for. Gonna have to skin a lot of coyotes to offset this! LOL. Another hobby my wife doesn't share my passion for. Whaaaaaat? Taking guns from the safe once in awhile to show them, not much fun. This truck IS FUN!
 

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Marty

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Staff member
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Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
3,869
Location
Massachusetts
Hey Marty.
Wow, that's impressive. You are really good. Really first class finger picking and neck work. Personally I don't think you need ANY lessons. I play and fingerpick also (not at your level). I play some melody but it's more picking and singing. Started out in Folk music but mostly today it's stuff like Gorden Lightfoot, some country and have been writing some of my own songs. I am not familiar with the Irish Guitar? Is that a separate instrument or a different style of playing? FP
Thanks for kind word guys.
I’m sometimes asked where I learned to play the classical guitar. My present teacher is from the Berkley School of Music. When I was young I took lessons from a retired Symphony Orchestra Violinist. He taught me the classical guitar styles of Matteo Carcassi, Andes Segovia and Ferdinand Sor.
The guitar is only an accompanying instrument in the world of traditional Irish tunes. Chording is the standard. Irish music has deep roots in unwritten, hand-me-down tunes, and therein lies the difficulty… you must know the melody of a tunes which are often played in sets of 3. Drop-D tuning is often standard, but other string tunings such as D-A-D-G-A-D are used.
 

Marty

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Moderator
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
3,869
Location
Massachusetts
I have been catching up on building Cedar arrows for this fall. I have several different weight bows and styles so I make a dozen for each bow each year. I have been splicing some turkey feathers from my tom last year and some white turkey feathers for some hunting arrows I'm making. I will be putting stone points on the next set.
Mike
Me like!:thumbs up:
"stone points"...now that's cool. Send a pic is you can later.:)
 

Hanshi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
795
Thank you, Flashpoint. I have to say, Marty, that if you can shoot just half as well as you play guitar, any flea at 100 yards isn't safe! Excellent!
 

gemihur

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2012
Messages
56
It was a 'gas'
Absolutely loved it!
Thanks, man
Brought me back to the good old days
 

drax05

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FML Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
90
Location
Lower Left Alabama, or Alaska
one of my hobbies since 1980, is making turkey calls. Last one numbered 322, but only have about 2/3 that number actually made (long story). I do them in spurts. Take a notion and make 3-4, and year or two later, more. As we are self imposed isolation on the farm now, I should do a few more as I have plenty wing bones around, but it's garden planting time, and I'm trying to get up courage to go out to the co-op and get fertilizer. May need all I plant this year......
Photo on 5-2-18 at 4.32 PM #3.jpg
 

Hanshi

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Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
795

Billy-by-gosh

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Joined
Jul 11, 2019
Messages
50
All I can add is "WOW"! I Really enjoyed seeing and hearing everything. Thank you for sharing such amazing talents.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
3,869
Location
Massachusetts
As always I'm left of center. One of my hobbies, a money injection '90 Silverado with a 71 Olds 468 cu inj from a W-31 series 442. Complete computer controlled fuel injected roller motor, alum heads with oversize valves . approx. 450-500 HP, new Dyno just installed in Laramie so I'll know this summer. Always had fast Oldsmobiles when I could afford them when younger so I wanted the pickup Olds never built. Currently in the bodyshop being painted, wishing now I had waited on this phase of my project considering the economic environment. Oh well, that's what I sold my bike for. Gonna have to skin a lot of coyotes to offset this! LOL. Another hobby my wife doesn't share my passion for. Whaaaaaat? Taking guns from the safe once in awhile to show them, not much fun. This truck IS FUN!
Nice Silverado! Classic vehicles are fun to own and modify.
I like the old cast iron blocks/heads engines, so I have a low-mileage 2004 Taurus 3.0L V6 with the VULCAN engine.

Interesting there is no RED-Line indicator at 7,000 RPM's.
 

Sparkitoff

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Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Messages
283
I study new "hard rock" and "grunge" music, aka "Octane" for scriptural and biblical references. I have an M.A. in English and Literature and have had a short run as a song-writer, had a band that travelled all over and there is a CD floating around. I'm also a Certified Community Chaplain and Associate Pastor now. That may explain the hobby. Interesting to me is that some "head bangers" and "hard rockers" are nodding along to the beat and have no idea that there is actually a message in the lyrics. They may think the band is hard-core (and they may be in style) but there is actually a bible reference, message of hope or reference to scripture within the lyrics. Thousand Foot Crutch, Pop Evil, Red Sun Rising, Creed, Skillet, Trivium, Breaking Benjamin and Asking Alexandra … are just a handful of "Octane" bands with these type lyrics in their songs.
 

Standing Bear

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Joined
Jan 30, 2014
Messages
226
My first car was a ‘56 Victoria turquoise and white. Came across this in ‘04 soooo. Original 292 Y block 312 crank (.144” stroke) bored .080 = 317 cid. Series E heads 1.54:1 rockers, Clay Smith 284 cam, Barry Grant 650 cfm Road Demon on a Blue Thunder aluminum intake. 11” clutch hooks it to a World Class T5 tranny w 3.73 gears out back.

2,000 rpm at 70mph in the high hole. Near 14 second in1/4 mile. Calculates to do 140-150 but not enough road to wind it AND stop.
 

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Mossie

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FML Supporter
Joined
Jan 29, 2017
Messages
163
My first car was a ‘56 Victoria turquoise and white. Came across this in ‘04 soooo. Original 292 Y block 312 crank (.144” stroke) bored .080 = 317 cid. Series E heads 1.54:1 rockers, Clay Smith 284 cam, Barry Grant 650 cfm Road Demon on a Blue Thunder aluminum intake. 11” clutch hooks it to a World Class T5 tranny w 3.73 gears out back.

2,000 rpm at 70mph in the high hole. Near 14 second in1/4 mile. Calculates to do 140-150 but not enough road to wind it AND stop.
Relieved to see there are still some old gearheads out there! My first was a '36 Ford club Opera? coupe with a '41 Merc flathead. Family album 1" thick, car album 2" thick. Gotta love those old Vickys!
 
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Hanshi

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Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
795
My very first car was a 1951 Plymouth; followed a couple years later by a 1950 Plymouth. I miss them both dearly.
 

RonC

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FML Supporter
Joined
Sep 9, 2013
Messages
1,158
My first car was a ‘56 Victoria turquoise and white. Came across this in ‘04 soooo. Original 292 Y block 312 crank (.144” stroke) bored .080 = 317 cid. Series E heads 1.54:1 rockers, Clay Smith 284 cam, Barry Grant 650 cfm Road Demon on a Blue Thunder aluminum intake. 11” clutch hooks it to a World Class T5 tranny w 3.73 gears out back.

2,000 rpm at 70mph in the high hole. Near 14 second in1/4 mile. Calculates to do 140-150 but not enough road to wind it AND stop.
Brings back memories! My first car (shared with my mother) was a 55 Ford Fairlane convertible. In the early 60's, we traded our 1950 Plymouth for the Ford. One of the few differences between the 55 and 56 Ford Fairlane was that the running lights on the 56 were pointed and were flat on the 55.
The plastic rear window was scratched up to a point that nothing could be seen in the rear view mirror. The motor for the convertible top was burned out.
This is a photo of a 55 Ford Fairlane I found on the net with the colors of the one I had: strawberry and cream (really pink and white):
55_Ford-Sunliner-DV-10-MB_09.jpg

I went with a date to my senior prom in the 55 Ford. I have better recall of the car than of the date.
Ron
 
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