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flashpoint

Well-Known Member
FML Supporter
Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
146
Hey everyone.
I have a nice powder horn and not being particularly craft oriented, I was wondering if anyone knows how I might give it a more antiqued look? It's smooth and nicely polished so I don't know if it would take any kind of dye treatment. I am looking for a warm amber-ish tan patina like you would see on some of the older horns.
Thanks for any suggestions. FP
 

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Sonny Rich

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2020
Messages
88
Try a little dab of old English furniture polish,they have dark and lighter polishes. I use the dark now and them on my deer skull antlers,i had an artist lady paint Sitting Bull on the skull..
 

Mossie

Well-Known Member
FML Supporter
Joined
Jan 29, 2017
Messages
236
I'm sure roughing the surface a little and warming it up some would help it to take any stain. Out
 

flashpoint

Well-Known Member
FML Supporter
Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
146
Since horn is a hair compressed, you sure shouldn't overlook hair dye. Comes in platinum through black and different manufacturers have different colors and variations of colors. Use vinyl gloves and thicker cotton cloth to apply.
That's a really good point Jack. It being compressed hair never did occur to me. I'll check it out. Thanks. FP
 

Mad Irish Jack ODonnell

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
108
Location
sw PA -Allegheny Co, McDonald, PA
When I started in the hobby, before it became a good part of life itself; I used old coffee grounds tea, etc (and fresh) in boiling water to do stains on bone, as well as horn ( warm water- boiling will do things you may not want the horn to do. Maybe) Bone and antler sometimes need antiquing; like pipes and such. Now, I include hair dyes as well as clothes dies. FYI
 

drax05

Well-Known Member
FML Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
164
Location
Lower Left Alabama, or Alaska
Onion skins, several ways to do it. Do a google search, Muzzleloader mag. years ago, I believe, had a story on it. I did age a couple of mine, but after thinking about it, decided in 1800, the horn I was using would have been and looked new. It takes a while to naturally turn. I can show you 3 of mine made in the 70's that are still quite white, over 40 years now. I did take off a Jersy cow horn that was naturally yellow/brown and looked great, for a priming horn when we still had a dairy.
 

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