1st Possibles pouch kit

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CO_MTNman

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May 7, 2019
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I am not sure, I haven't thought that far ahead yet, any suggestions
 

CO_MTNman

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May 7, 2019
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49
20210420_180925.jpg20210420_180918.jpg
Buckle attached to the shorter strap. Next step is to attach the shoulder straps to the bag
 

Bull

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May 2, 2016
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As for the leather protection, there are several choices depending on if you want to stick with historically correct or modern. Pure neatsfoot oil is good, and if you want or need water resistance then Sno-seal is a good choice. Thoroughly modern is a product that I used on my stovepipe boots as well as on my gun rig and such (back when I was still doing the SASS thing/SASS #35973 just in case you care) is Leather Lube. I found it to be quite useful and coated most of my current possibles bags with it. Never on suede though. Please stay away from suede BTW, you'll thank me later.
One last suggestion is Bear oil. Which is not sold in stores and can't be legally sold in most states if
memory serves me correctly. In that case hopefully you can find someone to barter or trade with you.

Forgot to mention good old beeswax. Warm it up a little or place your leather item in the sun light and rub it in.
 
Last edited:

newtire

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Joined
May 21, 2016
Messages
126
As for the leather protection, there are several choices depending on if you want to stick with historically correct or modern. Pure neatsfoot oil is good, and if you want or need water resistance then Sno-seal is a good choice. Thoroughly modern is a product that I used on my stovepipe boots as well as on my gun rig and such (back when I was still doing the SASS thing/SASS #35973 just in case you care) is Leather Lube. I found it to be quite useful and coated most of my current possibles bags with it. Never on suede though. Please stay away from suede BTW, you'll thank me later.
One last suggestion is Bear oil. Which is not sold in stores and can't be legally sold in most states if
memory serves me correctly. In that case hopefully you can find someone to barter or trade with you.

Forgot to mention good old beeswax. Warm it up a little or place your leather item in the sun light and rub it in.
Worked at a leather tannery a long time ago. Worked for awhile behind the splitting machine. Side (half-hide) is fed in sideways. Big long knife rolling between roller wheels splits off the top grain. Top grain is what shoes, boots, belts, wallets, upholstery is made of. The bottom piece is a “split”. They sold these to Mexico. These became items for the tourist trade and sold as “suede”. Real suede is actually the top grain just buffed so it has the tightly wound fibers of top grain. The bottom (split) is really weak stuff. Not worth a crap. Just a FYI.
 

Winter Hawk

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Dec 26, 2015
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161
I second neatsfoot oil and/or Sno-Seal. Make sure the neatsfoot oil is pure, many years ago I got some for a saddle and it had some kind of rubber additive, IIRC. It was NOT good, and took a long time to get the gunk off. Sno-Seal is beeswax based; I've used it since 1967 for boots and any other leather I needed to waterproof. And, it makes a dandy patch lube!
 
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Mad L

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Joined
May 1, 2019
Messages
23
Location
Nevada
I have used Montana Pitch Blend for years. Good on most full grain leather, do not use on sued and test first on buckskin.
It's a blend of Pine Pitch, Mink oil, and Bees wax.
Some leather might darken a shade, it will look Dark when first applied but lightens back up in a few days.
With the Oil (in bottle) I have restored some 50 year old dried out leather to New!
I use it on straps at first sign of dry cracking, gives them back their flexibility and stops the cracking!

They claim it to be a 100 year old recipe and used by many saddle makers. Will not 'water proof' but does make water Resistant.
(I have even used on canvas bags and caps)
 

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Bull

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May 2, 2016
Messages
24
Worked at a leather tannery a long time ago. Worked for awhile behind the splitting machine. Side (half-hide) is fed in sideways. Big long knife rolling between roller wheels splits off the top grain. Top grain is what shoes, boots, belts, wallets, upholstery is made of. The bottom piece is a “split”. They sold these to Mexico. These became items for the tourist trade and sold as “suede”. Real suede is actually the top grain just buffed so it has the tightly wound fibers of top grain. The bottom (split) is really weak stuff. Not worth a crap. Just a FYI.
Plus, use of suede in places and for items where top grain cow hide or deerskin is traditional just makes for a farby look. By that I mean showing up wearing clothing or carrying accoutrements that existed only on a Hollywood set because the folks in wardrobe don't know any better. For instance, one of John Wayne's movies begins on a riverboat, sometime in the early 19th century. He's a Texas Ranger hunting for a wanted man, which he gets and then takes back to Texas. Clothing and firearms while on the riverboat is somewhat correct for the period but as soon as they get off the dock and on horseback the Duke is wearing pants with belt loops, a suede vest, ten gallon hat and of course his trademark 1873 Peacemaker. The Duke can do no wrong but anyone else is going to get called on it.
 

McClura

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Dec 31, 2015
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67
Location
Oklahoma
That will be a nice bag when complete. Good idea tapering the bag width, bottom to top. It helps keep things in your bag better. On leather like you are using I use it for bags and other items and I use Neatfoot Oil. Several applications of it and it will be nearly waterproof. The Pine Pitch leather oil is another that is great. I used it on some of my knife sheaths which makes the inside of the sheaths a little more sticky to retain the knife.
Both are good. Good luck with the rest of the job on the bag.
After getting my bags done, I wear it around a little and find where I would like my short starter and patch knife, then sew a small piece of leather on the strap, at chest level, making a sort of sheath for the starter and patch knife. I hang my powder measures, , a 50 grn. and a 80 gran made of Moose antler tips on the strap and also a touch hole pick if you have a flintlock.
Good job.
Mike
 

newtire

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Joined
May 21, 2016
Messages
126
Plus, use of suede in places and for items where top grain cow hide or deerskin is traditional just makes for a farby look. By that I mean showing up wearing clothing or carrying accoutrements that existed only on a Hollywood set because the folks in wardrobe don't know any better. For instance, one of John Wayne's movies begins on a riverboat, sometime in the early 19th century. He's a Texas Ranger hunting for a wanted man, which he gets and then takes back to Texas. Clothing and firearms while on the riverboat is somewhat correct for the period but as soon as they get off the dock and on horseback the Duke is wearing pants with belt loops, a suede vest, ten gallon hat and of course his trademark 1873 Peacemaker. The Duke can do no wrong but anyone else is going to get called on it.
I see alot of guns sent from the 1890's era in 1870's era movies. Didn't think they had time machines back then.
 

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